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miki.bg

Znao sam ko će prvi da se javi :D 

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Venom

Cekajuci farmaceutski trickle down effect

 

One-shot cures for diseases are not great for business—more specifically, they’re bad for longterm profits—Goldman Sachs analysts noted in an April 10 report for biotech clients, first reported by CNBC.

The investment banks’ report, titled “The Genome Revolution,” asks clients the touchy question: “Is curing patients a sustainable business model?” The answer may be “no,” according to follow-up information provided.

 

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/04/curing-disease-not-a-sustainable-business-model-goldman-sachs-analysts-say/

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miki.bg

Things that happen in Silicon Valley and also the Soviet Union
 

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Anton Troynikov‏ @atroyn

Things that happen in Silicon Valley and also the Soviet Union: 

- waiting years to receive a car you ordered, to find that it's of poor workmanship and quality 
- promises of colonizing the solar system while you toil in drudgery day in, day out

- living five adults to a two room apartment 
- being told you are constructing utopia while the system crumbles around you

- 'totally not illegal taxi' taxis by private citizens moonlighting to make ends meet 
- everything slaved to the needs of the military-industrial complex

- mandatory workplace political education 
- productivity largely falsified to satisfy appearance of sponsoring elites

- deviation from mainstream narrative carries heavy social and political consequences 
- networked computers exist but they're really bad

- Henry Kissinger visits sometimes for some reason

- elite power struggles result in massive collateral damage, sometimes purges 
- failures are bizarrely upheld as triumphs

- otherwise extremely intelligent people just turning the crank because it's the only way to get ahead

- the plight of the working class is discussed mainly by people who do no work

- the United States as a whole is depicted as evil by default

- the currency most people are talking about is fake and worthless

 

Edited by miki.bg

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dillinger

Zato razmena među najvećim azijskim zemljama raste eksponencijalno, u pripremi je najveći trgovinski sporazum ikada - RCEP (TPP minus USA, plus Kina i Indija)...

 

 

Globalizacija može i bez Amerike.

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miki.bg
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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos on Wednesday announced a $2 billion philanthropic fund to finance a new network of preschools and contribute to nonprofits assisting homeless families.

Bezos said on Twitter that the schools would be located in underserved communities and would be operated by his new Bezos Day One Fund.

“We’ll use the same set of principles that have driven Amazon,” he said in his statement. “Most important among those will be genuine, intense customer obsession. The child will be the customer.”

 

 

 

Edited by miki.bg

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miki.bg
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Lab Rats is a lively and spirited takedown of a human resources industry that is increasingly brazen in its unabashed parasitism. Its core argument – that “dignity, respect, stability and security still matter” – is surely irrefutable. The book is the latest addition to a growing body of literature taking issue with the normalisation of precarious and long-hours work.

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A few years ago, Dan Lyons, a former technology journalist with Newsweek, endured an unhappy stint with a software startup called HubSpot. Initially dazzled by the company’s youthful vibe – all ping-pong tables and beanbags – he quickly became disillusioned. “Beneath their bubbly exteriors,” he recalls, “many people were anxious, frightened, unhappy, and massively stressed out.” He wrote a bestselling book about that experience, Disrupted: My Misadventures in the Start-Up Bubble (2016). In Lab Rats, Lyons warns that the oppressive working culture he witnessed in the tech industry is being rolled out to other businesses, including some in the public sector, thanks to the efforts of a coterie of high-end management consultants. These are a truly strange breed, combining ludicrous pomposity with an almost psychopathic earnestness. Lyons frequently refers to them as “mad” or “nutty”.

Many venture capital-funded tech startups operate a business model premised on high staff turnover, wherein, he writes: “Employees can (and should) be underpaid, overworked, exhausted and then discarded.” The aim is to maximise the value of the company in the short term, with a view to cashing out when it is sold at an IPO.

Management gurus have a particular fondness for cloaking their practices in military and sporting metaphors: LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman believes we should think of the employer-employee relationship in terms of a “tour of duty”, while Netflix’s notoriously brutal human resources “culture code” declares that the organisation is “a team, not a family” – the idea being that your place in a team is contingent on your performance, whereas the unconditional love of a family is bound to engender complacency. Lyons rightly points out that the analogy is specious, since “the best pro sports teams succeed exactly because the players feel like a family”.

Job insecurity and wage inequality have been rising ever since the years of Reagan and Thatcher, but the advent of digital technology has exacerbated this trend, making it easier for companies such as Uber to assemble and manage large armies of low-paid contract employees. Whatever these workers might gain in flexibility is more than cancelled out by the disadvantages: “gig economy” work invariably means no health insurance, no retirement pension, no child-care provisions or paid holidays – all things Stephen DeWitt, the CEO of a startup selling “labour clouds” of freelance contractors, breezily dismisses as “old-model inefficiencies”. Citing evidence linking chronic mild stress to declining mental health, increasing antidepressant usage and rising suicide rates, Lyons reminds us that an economy built on insecurity is a public health time bomb. It is a cruel paradox that the very workers who are enervated by long-hours culture are expected to surrender ever more of their depleted emotional energy to their employers. Competence alone no longer cuts it; Lyons interviewed one woman whose boss fired her because she didn’t “seem excited enough”.


Više na https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/dec/27/lab-rats-dan-lyons-seasonal-associate-heike-geissler-review

Edited by miki.bg

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