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bad music for bad people

R.I.P.

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batticuore

a ja bas ovih dana ponovo uzela Floyd-e da slusam...nekad sam ih mlogo slusala.Richard Wright, rest in peace...

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Mp40

Ljudi, pa umro Lepi Sisoje (Zvonko)...Sve sam mislio da ce Matilda ili neki drugi ljubitelj pravih vrednosti ovo primetiti i ozaliti ali niko nije...Preminuo je jos prosle nedelje. nmxe7d.jpgBluz dibiduz!

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vinska musica

Preminuo i Vice Vukov, nakon 3 godine kome.

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Lale Gator
Preminuo gitarista Bajage i Instruktora, Buba OpačićGitarista Bajage i Instruktora Ljubiša Buba Opačić iznenada je preminuo 28. septembra u Mariboru gde se sa bendom nalazio na turneji po Sloveniji, saopštila je promoterska kuća "Long play"."Opačić je poslednji koncert sa Bajagom i Instruktorima održao 27. septembra u Mariboru. Opačić je preminuo tokom noći u snu u svojoj hotelskoj sobi. Datum i mesto sahrane biće naknadno određeni", saopštio je "Long Play".

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Parsons

ripWhen the world falls apart some things stay in placeLevi stubbs tears run down his face

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bad music for bad people

nathaniel mayer, jbg.

Nathaniel Mayer, one of the greatest rock'n'roll singers of all time passed away on Oct. 31st, he was 64 years old and died after having a stroke, his second. Nathaniel, like yesterday's subject Andre Williams started out on Detroit's Fortune label where he recorded the all time classic "Village Of Love" which went top 40 in 1962 under the name of Nathaniel Mayer and the Fabulous Twilights, although I don't think there really was a Fabulous Twilights. For Fortune he cut killer sides like -- "Hurting Love" "I Had A Dream", "My Last Dance With You", "Well I Got News", "Leave Me Alone", the live garage-soul "Going Back To The Village Of Love", "I'm Not Gonna Cry", a Christmas record "Mr. Santa Claus", "A Place I Know", winding up his Fortune recording career with the super funky "I Want Love and Affection (Not The House Of Correction)". In all he cut nine singles and one LP for Fotune, all great. His voice always seemed on the verge of cracking, giving him a unique sound quite unlike any other singer I can think of. I didn't know Nate but we had lots of mutual friends and he had suprised virtually everyone in Detroit by staging something of a comeback in recent years, recording an LP for Fat Possum (I Just Wanna Be Held) with members of the Dirtbombs and Black Keys as well as touring. Norton two singles, one recorded in 1968--"I Don't Want No Bald Headed Woman Tellin' Me What To Do" and a live re-make of "Mr. Santa Claus" He's seen below performing I think in Spain. The only good story I have is from the late Cub Koda whose band the Del-Tinos were backing Nathaniel at a high school sock hop in the early sixties. At showtime Nathaniel was no where to be found, finally after checking all the bathroom stalls they found him, Cub said it was the first time he ever saw anyone shoot up. Later, Nathaniel got into crack before cleaning up and making a comeback. Rest in peace Nathaniel.

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Bane5

Glas koji se jednom radja?Peruvian songbird Yma Sumac dead at 86LOS ANGELES (AFP) — Legendary soprano Yma Sumac, the "Peruvian Songbird who dazzled music lovers in the 1950s and 60s with her incredible range, died at an assisted living facility in Los Angeles, her website said Monday. She was 86."It is with deep sadness, that we report that Yma Sumac passed away at 11 am on Saturday November 1st. It was peaceful. Those closest to her were at her side," said a website statement.The Los Angeles Times said Sumac, who had been living in Los Angeles for the past 60 years, died of cancer.Sumac was born Zoila Augusta Emperatriz Chavarri del Castillo, in Peru, but rose to fame through her golden vocals in the Hollywood of the 1950s, where she took the name of Yma Sumac, or "how pretty" in Inca's Quechua language.The Peruvian Songbird, as she became known, traveled across Europe and Japan presenting herself as an Inca priestess and astounding audiences with her five-octave range.She acted with Charlton Heston in the 1953 film "The Secret of the Inca," and cut numerous records with her unique style combining folk music, jazz, salsa and even rock 'n' roll that made her both famous and critically acclaimed."Yma Sumac has a voice totally out of the ordinary," said Lyrical Association of Peru president Enrique Bernales.He told Lima's radio RPP she had a range of five-octaves, "the only known voice in the 20th century capable of such a wonder ... she was never out of tune, with all the notes precise in tone and register.""She is the only Peruvian whose name is written in Hollywood's Walk of Fame," another Lima radio station said Monday, remembering Sumac.The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce said it would place flowers on the Peruvian Songbird's star in the fabled sidewalk, and called on all her fans to do likewise.Her website said that Sumac will have a private funeral and be buried at a Hollywood cemetery.When asked recently how she would like to be remembered, Sumac said: "That I made good music and brought happiness to people's hearts."

Edited by Bane5

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Sludge Factory
Umro Hendrixov bubnjar Mitch MitchellBubnjar Mitch Mitchell, najpoznatiji kao član trija Jimi Hendrix Experience, juče je pronađen mrtav u hotelskoj sobi u Portlandu.Imao je 62 godine; zvaničnici kažu da je po svoj prilici umro prirodnom smrću, a u planu je autopsija, preneo je AP.Nema više nikoga iz Experiencea: Hendrix je umro 1970, a basista Noel Redding 2003.Mitchell je bio na turneji Experience Hendrix; poslednji put je nastupio u petak u Portlandu.

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hoffnung

što se više zaljubljujem u njihovu muziku, sve više osećam i veliki gubitak. Činjenica da sam tek od pre dva dana čuo za taj trio i zaljubio se kao u devojku baš osećam žalost. žalost jer je mlad čovek. žalost zbog Dan-a i Magnusa. Osim što su izgubili desnu ruku u svom triu, izgubili su i prijatelja. 01jw4.jpg02zt7.jpg

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Parsons

RIP za folk legendu - odettuima je u long direction home ona koja je gitaru koristila i kao udaraljke

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maheem
Freddie Hubbard, widely regarded as the most gifted jazz trumpeter of the post-bebop ?60s and ?70s, died Monday at Sherman Oaks Hospital in Los Angeles. He was 70.By Don HeckmanDecember 30, 2008hubbard_schindelbeck_500p.jpgFreddie Hubbard, widely regarded as the most gifted jazz trumpeter of the post-bebop '60s and '70s, died Monday at Sherman Oaks Hospital in Los Angeles. He was 70.The cause of death was attributed to complications from a heart attack he suffered Nov. 26, according to Dave Weiss, his longtime manager.From the beginning, Hubbard's playing was characterized by its strength and assurance, its capacity to roam confidently across the trumpet's entire range, and his gift for spontaneous melodic invention.He was barely out of his teens in the late 1950s and working with such established jazz figures as drummer Philly Joe Jones, trombonist Slide Hampton, saxophonist Sonny Rollins and composer/arranger Quincy Jones. His identification as an important new arrival gained him a Down Beat Critics Poll Award when he was in his early 20s.Hubbard was capable of quickly grasping the subtleties as well as the specific elements of a startlingly wide range of stylistic areas, from the hard bop of his work with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers to the most avant-garde music of the decade.Seemingly the first choice for artists of every stripe, he was present on many of the most significant jazz albums of the '60s, among them Ornette Coleman's "Free Jazz," John Coltrane's "Ascension," Eric Dolphy's "Out To Lunch," Oliver Nelson's "Blues and the Abstract Truth," Wayne Shorter's "Speak No Evil" and Herbie Hancock's "Maiden Voyage.""Hubbard," wrote Joachim Berendt in "The Jazz Book: From New Orleans to Rock and Free Jazz," "is the most brilliant trumpeter of a generation of musicians who stand with one foot in 'tonal' jazz and with the other in the atonal camp."Although his playing, especially in the earliest years, reflected the influence of Clifford Brown, Miles Davis and others, he said saxophonists were most influential in his development, often specifically mentioning Coltrane's "sheets of sound" as an important source."I always practice with saxophone players," he told Julie Coryell and Laura Friedman in their book, "Jazz-Rock Fusion: The People, the Music." "I find when you get around trumpet players, you get into competitive playing -- who can play the loudest and the highest. After you develop your own style, you don't want to get into that."Like many players in his generation, Hubbard was drawn to pop and rock interests in the '70s and '80s. In 1977 he toured with Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Ron Carter and Tony Williams in the quasi-Miles Davis ensemble V.S.O.P. And he released a series of rock- and pop-oriented albums on the CTI label."Red Clay," "First Light" and "Straight Life" received good reviews, and "First Light" was awarded a Grammy in 1972 for best jazz performance by a group. Later CTI albums received generally negative criticism.In the early '90s, the intensity with which Hubbard had always approached his trumpet caught up with him. After splitting his lip in 1992, he ignored the injury, continuing to play on a European tour. The lip became badly infected, and his physician insisted on a biopsy. No cancer was found, but Hubbard spent the next few years struggling to regain his early ability to articulate his instrument.His playing over the last decade was uneven, at best. In his most recent local appearance, at Catalina Bar & Grill in April, he performed with The New Jazz Composers Octet, an ensemble organized by Weiss, who was Hubbard's arranger and producer.Although he performed on fluegelhorn, a more forgiving instrument than the trumpet for players with lip problems, Hubbard did brief solo segments, revealing only traces of the player who Weiss said "played faster, longer, higher and with more energy than any other trumpeter of his era."Hubbard was born Frederick DeWayne Hubbard in Indianapolis on April 7, 1938. He was the youngest of six children in a musical household and first played the tonette and then the mellophone."I had a sister who played classical piano and sang spirituals," he told Coryell and Friedman. "My mother played the piano by ear and I had a brother who played the bass and tenor. So the music was hot and heavy. You'd hear somebody singing, somebody playing the piano, and always a record playing."He took up the trumpet in junior high school, and also played fluegelhorn, piano, French horn, sousaphone and tuba.Moving to New York City in 1958, when he was 20, Hubbard quickly became known as one of the important new jazz arrivals. In the early '70s, his career well-established, he moved to Los Angeles, settling in the San Fernando Valley.He received a Jazz Masters Award from the National Endowment for the Arts in 2006.Hubbard is survived by his wife, Briggie, and his son, Duane.Funeral services are pending. A memorial tribute in New York will be planned in the new year.Heckman is a freelance jazz writer.
Rest In Peace Maestro :(
Edited by maheem

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