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Њујоркер

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Њујоркер
Dakle, nedostaje nam cetvrti/a (pc) za nedeljni matine u Medisonu. Cijena, prava sitnica cool.gif
Дођосмо, видесмо, изгубисмо. angry.gif Ништа ново на Бродвеју :frust: А да ми дан буде комплетан, и Патриотси ми испали :cry: иако су 11-5 ове сезоне. Е бем ти дан кад и устах из кревета, што га не преспавах васцелог...Мало локалне историје: обећах Лучу да ћу да прочепркам мало по историји Марбл Хила, јединог ћошка Менхетна, који се нашао на континенту! Даклем:
Marble HillThe Marble Hill community in the Bronx is the only part of Manhattan connected to the mainland, due to a little-known quirk of geography. Originally, this 42-acre enclave was the northernmost section of the borough of Manhattan and was surrounded by the winding Spuyten Duyvil Creek.In 1895 the course of the Spuyten Duyvil Creek was changed to improve navigation around Manhattan, thus physically separating Marble Hill from Manhattan. For 19 years it remained as an artificial island until the ground that was removed to make way for the new course of the creek was used as landfill for the former course of the stream.The name of Marble Hill was conceived by Darius C. Crosby in 1891 from the local deposits of dolomite marble, which is a relatively soft rock that overlay the Inwood and Marble Hill communities. The marble was quarried for the Federal buildings in lower Manhattan when New York was the Capital of the United States in the 1780s.Historically speaking, Marble Hill has been occupied since the Dutch colonial period. On August 18, 1646, Governor Kieft signed a land grant to Mattius Jansen van Keulan and Huyck Aertsen. This grant had comprised the whole of the present community. Johannes Verveelen petitioned the Harlem authorities to move his ferry from what is now the East River and 125th Street to the Spuyten Duyvil Creek because the creek was shallow enough to wade across, thus evading paying the toll. The ferry charter was granted in 1669.Teunissen Place was named for Tobias Teunissen, a wool washer from Leyden, Holland, who came to the area in 1636. He applied and received a land grant to live in Inwood near 213th Street. Occasionally he had worked on the De La Montagne farm, which was located in what is now the Harlem section of Manhattan. Teunissen was killed in an Indian raid in 1655, and his wife and child were held hostage until they were ransomed by the Dutch authorities. The Dyckmans and the Nagles, who owned land in Inwood, purchased the Teunissen property in 1677.Two bridges connected Marble Hill with the mainland. These were the Kingsbridge, constructed in 1693 by Frederick Philipse, and the Dyckman Bridge, constructed in 1759 by Jacobus Dyckman and Benjamin Palmer. The Kingsbridge was built as a toll bridge under Royal Charter for Frederick Phillipse. The Dyckman Bridge was constructed as a toll-free bridge for the farmers who refused to pay the toll. Both bridges have been covered over with landfill. At 210 West 230th Street on the southwest corner of Broadway and 230th is a plaque designating the area as the site of the Kings Bridge. The Dyckman Free Bridge is located on the grounds of the Marble Hill Houses.One of the local visiting spots during this period was a tavern operated by the Dyckman family. They had a tavern called the Black Horse Inn, located near McGown?s Pass in what is now Central Park. The Dyckmans sold the Black Horse to finance a new operation on the west side of Broadway and 226th Street that was to be managed by Benjamin Palmer, who owned property on City Island. It was situated to cater to the traffic from both bridges. In 1772 the Dyckmans sold the tavern to Caleb Hyatt and was known by the new owner?s name as Hyatt?s Tavern at the Free Bridge.When hostilities broke out at the start of the American Revolution, the Continental Army constructed a fort on Marble Hill as part of a series of forts to defend the area. By November of 1776, the fort had been taken over by Hessian forces and re-named Fort Prince Charles in honor of Charles, Prince of Brunswick, brother-in-law to King George III of England. Despite contrary beliefs, the Kingsbridge and the Dyckman Free Bridge served as escape routes for the retreating American forces after the Battle of Fort Washington on November 16, 1776.In January 1777, an American attack was made in the Marble Hill area against the Hessian occupiers. This particular raid was under the command of General Heath, which, when the cannons opened up, forced the Hessians to retreat from the tavern to the fort to return fire.After the war ended, the tavern remained in the Hyatt family until 1807, when it was leased to James Devoe. The building was eventually razed and its successor was the Kingsbridge Hotel, which was located on the east side of Broadway and 226th Street.The hotel had a mansard roof and a central turret. It catered to the anglers and sportsman who came to the area either by the Hudson River Railroad Company or boat service up the Harlem River. One of the meals served at the hotel was turtle dinner, which became a favorite of the guests. The hotel?s business declined when Broadway was widened and interest was lost in the community. The hotel fell into disrepair and was torn down in 1917.In 1817 Curtis and John Bolton purchased land in the area. Their home was on the south side of the community and had a mill located 350 East of Broadway on property now owned by Metro North. The Boltons were related to Reginald Bolton, the noted historian of Northern Manhattan.Saint Stephen?s United Methodist Church has been a fixture of the community for well over a century and a half. It is presently located on 228th Street and Marble Hill Avenue. The church was constructed in 1898 and is the third structure of the same name. This congregation was in existence since 1825 and was incorporated a decade later, making it one of the earliest religious institutions in the area.One of its pastors was Reverend William Tieck who served the church from 1946 to 1977. Dr. Tieck was well known as the official Bronx County Historian, in which capacity he served from 1989 to 1996. Reverend Tieck authored several books on the Bronx, one of which is called Riverdale, Kingsbridge, Spuyten Duyvil New York City, A Historical Epitome of the Northwest Bronx, published in 1968.The IRT Subway was extended from 145th Street to 242nd Street and opened in 1906. The station stop for the IRT at Marble Hill is 225th Street. Metro North has a station in Marble Hill. The station was originally located on the east side of Broadway but was renovated and relocated to the west side of Broadway. It is the only station that is located in the Borough of Manhattan, as the rest of the line has stations in the Bronx.This sparked land speculation in the community, and 6-story apartment houses were constructed. In the early 1950s urban renewal came to the area. A complex was built bounded by Broadway, Exterior Street and 225th Street and was called the Marble Hill Houses. This property was acquired by New York City on August 26, 1948. The houses were completed in 1952. Part of the acquisition was used to become the Marble Hill Playground, which is located on Marble Hill Avenue between 228th and 230th Streets.On March 11, 1939, Bronx Borough President James J. Lyons took advantage of the border wars that were raging between the Bronx and Manhattan. As a publicity stunt, Lyons planted the Bronx County flag on the rocky promontory at 225th Street and Jacobus Place. Lyons proclaimed Marble Hill as a part of the Bronx and demanded the subservience of its residents to the Bronx.The response to the incident was met with boos and thumb nosing by 50 residents of Marble Hill. In addition, the residents refused to change their status and wanted to remain loyal residents of Manhattan. Petitions and signatures were gathered to be sent to Governor Herbert Lehman to ensure Marble Hill?s status to remain part of Manhattan. To this day residents of the community who serve on jury duty have to go to lower Manhattan to serve.John F. Kennedy High School is located in Marble Hill and was opened in the 1970s. Presently, there is a new shopping complex being constructed on the south side of 225th Street between Broadway and Exterior Streets.A new shopping mall will be the center of attraction for Marble Hill. This mall is located on 225th Street between Broadway and Exterior Street and overlooks the Harlem River. Target and Marshall?s opened on July 25, 2004. There is an Appleby?s Restaurant that will be opening to serve the shoppers of the mall.Even though it is the landlocked part of Manhattan, Marble Hill still enjoys the privileges enjoyed by the borough. Residents who serve on jury duty are required to go to the courthouses on Center Street in lower Manhattan. The residents enjoy the representation of the offices of City Council District 10 Manhattan as well as the elected officials of Manhattan and the Bronx. Bronx Community Board 8 oversees the day-to-day operations of Marble Hill.
MarbleHillMap.gifМарбл Хил данасMarbleHill1777.jpgМарбл Хил и Спајтен Дајвил Крик 1777.А о Спајетн Дајвил поточићу веле:
Spuyten Duyvil Creek and the Harlem River Ship CanalThe history of the Spuyten Duyvil Creek and the Harlem River Ship Canal dates back to the pre-colonial period of New York City. It has a rich history that encompasses the immediate area it serves.Inwood Hill Park was known as ?shorakapkok,? which is translated as ?the sitting down place. The Mohican ?showaukuppock? translated as ?cove.? The Delaware Indians called it ?w?shakuppek? which was ?smooth still water? when interpreted from their language. According to Reginald Pelham Bolton, the noted historian and archaeologist of the area, another term used by local Native Americans was ?saperewack,? which meant ?the glistening place.? One of the tribal groups that lived in the area, the Rechgawawanc, had made their homes here in the sheltering hillsides and close proximity to the fishing and hunting spots.At the point where the Spuyten Duyvil Creek and the Hudson River meet is an area known as Papparimamim. It was an island that the Rechgawawanc Indians used as a landing spot to trade. There are several meanings to ?Papparimamim.? Some of its meanings are ?to parcel out,? ?divide and divert,? and ?turning aside.? The site had become known as Berrian?s Neck and was used as a fortification during the American Revolution.The Dutch settlers have various spellings for Spuyten Duyvil. One version was ?spegkindiple,? another was ?Spitton Devil.? According to ?Father Knickerbocker?s History of New York? by Washington Irving, two other terms are shown: ?spijt den duyvil? and ?spiking devil.? Another expression that was used in 1693 was ?spiten devil.? During the American Revolution, another version of the site had appeared: this was ?speight-den-duyvil? and it was used by Johan Karl Philip von Krafft, a 2nd Lieutenant in the Hessian army under the command of General Knyphausen. The present-day term is a variation that is still used today.During the colonial period, the Dutch and the English had different uses for the Spuyten Duyvil Creek. In 1667, a resolution in favor of building a road from Harlem to New York was proposed. Two years later the resolution was rescinded in favor of a route to the north which finally came about on December 7, 1676. On December 9th a lane was opened and was called the King?s Way which in time became the Kingsbridge Road. In 1769, milestones were erected on the western side of the roadway from lower Manhattan.Johannes Verveelen, a Dutch landowner in the town of New Harlem, had a ferry at 125th Street and the East River that took passengers and cargo to the Bronx. After a period of time, Verveelen realized that people were going to the northern end of Manhattan and wading across the Spuyten Duyvil, thus avoiding the fare. He petitioned the authorities for an additional ferry charter for the new location and was granted one on February 27, 1669.Frederick Phillipse was issued a royal grant confirming manorial rights from the crown and enlarging them to the manor of Phillipsburg in 1693. As part of the grant, the ferry was replaced by Phillipse and was named the King?s Bridge to honor King William III. Phillipse was allowed to collect tolls from a patent signed by Governor Richard Nicholls. This toll applied to people, cattle or anything else that crossed it.In 1702 the property was willed to Phillipse?s grandson of the same name By act of the General Assembly of the Colony of New York on July 1, 1713, Phillipse was allowed to dismantle the bridge and rebuild it as a draw bridge. The present location of the bridge, if it were in operation today would be on Broadway near 231st Street.On New Years Day of 1759 Jacobus Dyckman erected a toll-free bridge with the help of his fellow farmers to avoid paying the toll and allow for access over the river. This bridge, known as the Free Bridge, was located on 225th Street between Broadway and the intersection of Bailey Avenue and West Kingsbridge Road. It connected Manhattan with the Fordham section of the Bronx. A tavern was established by the Dyckmans on the Manhattan side of the bridge and was sold in 1772 to Caleb Hyatt.During the American Revolution Hyatt?s Tavern became a guard house used by the Hessians after the fall of Fort Washington in November 1776. They had taken over the eight forts that paralleled the Harlem River.In December 1777, troops under the command of General Heath attacked the Kingsbridge area with the objective of ensuring that the Farmer?s Bridge and the King?s Bridge were rendered practically useless, thus diverting traffic to a pontoon bridge which connected the Bronx with the northern end of Seaman Avenue. At the end of the war, the Free Bridge was reconstructed to continue normal traffic of goods and services.In 1807 Jacob Hyatt leased the tavern to James DeVoe. The tavern?s more recent successor had become the Kingsbridge Hotel which had become a favorite for anglers and sportsman. The hotel was noted for its turtle soup. The premises was located on Muscoota (now 225th) Street.In 1904, under authorization of the New York State legislature, the part of the creek that was filled in from dredging at what is now 225th street was filled in at 230th and lots were sold for housing. Broadway was widened in 1917 and the Kingsbridge Hotel, which was in disrepair, was razed.One of the older and more colorful tales to come out of the area was that of Anthony van Corlear?s crossing of the Spuyten Duyvil. Van Corlear was a messenger of Peter Stuyvesant who sent him to warn the Dutch settlers and the Indians in what is now Westchester and the Bronx of the pending takeover of Nieuw Amsterdam by the British. According to a story revived by Washington Irving, van Corlear had jumped into the creek from a high promonotory in Manhattan in ?spite of the devil? into high tide, and heavy winds subsequently drowned him trying to cross the creek.In reality van Corlear waded across the creek. This story had been told and possibly exaggerated in a soldier?s journal in 1776. The journal was discovered by W. H. Shelton, curator of the Morris-Jumel Mansion.The Johnson Ironworks foundry was a familiar sight on the peninsula of the canal from 1853 until 1923. While in operation the foundry manufactured everything from iron bars to automobile engines. In 1924 the buildings were razed, and the peninsula was empty until the end of the Second World War, when it was dredged and the channel was straightened. Part of the peninsula that was separated had been incorporated into Inwood Hill Park.Chapter 586 of the New York Legislature was enacted on May 12, 1919, to create a Board of Conference to discuss how to straighten, widen and dredge the Spuyten Duyvil Creek. This legislation sounded the death knell of the Johnson Foundry. Work on the creek was started in 1898 and had to be completed.Marble Hill was the name of the community at the northernmost tip of Manhattan, which was severed by the construction and rerouting of the Harlem River Ship Canal. In 1895, Marble Hill was separated from Manhattan and for a time was an island until the landfill from the dredging had connected this bucolic part of Manhattan to the Bronx.After World War II, students from Columbia University established a boat club and other facilities at Baker Field in Inwood Hill Park. The group became interested in a rocky outcropping that needed some livening up. A large white ?C? was painted on the on the wall facing the creek. Since then, the ?C? has become a fixture for the area as well as a tourist attraction for the Circle Line Boat Tours.The Spuyten Duyvil Creek has bridges crossing its banks. The railroad trestle has served the trains going to Albany from New York City since the 1840s. The Henry Hudson Bridge, built by Robert Moses in 1938, has offered a view of the canal and the Hudson River since its opening. The Broadway Bridge has been rebuilt three times to meet the needs of automotive and subway traffic.Reginald Pelham Bolton, the noted civil engineer and historian for northern Manhattan, had a fondness for the Spuyten Duyvil. In his book, ?Washington Heights, Manhattan, Its Eventful Past,? he describes it thus: ?The crooked course of the Spuyten Duyvil Creek wound around the north side of Inwood Hill and bent sharply south around a marshy promonotory which seems to have been known to the native as Gowahasuasing. Through this point, the ship canal has been cut, leaving only its tip end as a small marshy islet, which serves to preserve the contour of part of the old creek.?
spuyten_duyvil_from_bridge.jpgХарлем Ривер данас

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Luc

Jadni Marbl Hil, toliko istorije, a na kraju pao u ruke onog polusveta sa Kariba...

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Luc

NYN - angry.gif Steta za pun Medison i veselu atmosferu :(

Edited by Luc

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fonTelefon
:blink: Ti zivis u pogresnom gradu bro. Poznati most.DUKEThey sent in their best man. And when we roll down the 69th streetbridge tomorrow on our way to freedom, we're gonna have their best manleading the way. From the neck up.The crowd cheers.DUKEOn the hood of my car!More cheers.

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smorrior

Dali to nekog zrace x-zraci antikosmopolitizma !

Jadni Marbl Hil, toliko istorije, a na kraju pao u ruke onog polusveta sa Kariba...

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Luc
:blink: Ti zivis u pogresnom gradu bro.
Ako si se meni obratio :blink: i ne zivim u gradu :P Vec na pristojnoj udaljenosti, sa bivsim stanovnicima Bronksa i sadasnjeg "spanskog" Harlema. cool.gif

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fonTelefon
Ako si se meni obratio :blink: i ne zivim u gradu :P Vec na pristojnoj udaljenosti, sa bivsim stanovnicima Bronksa i sadasnjeg "spanskog" Harlema. cool.gif
Tako blizu, a tako daleko. A kad idete u soping na jug pricate deci idemo u zooloski vrt?

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Luc
Tako blizu, a tako daleko. A kad idete u soping na jug pricate deci idemo u zooloski vrt?
Ovo je toliko debilno, da ne nema svrhe, da ti saljem smislen odgovor.

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fonTelefon

Mogao bi za pocetak da se izvines Karibljanima.

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smorrior

I ti bi mogao da se izvinis Lucu!!! U protivnom...

Mogao bi za pocetak da se izvines Karibljanima.

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Luc

Bilo je odlicno nocas u Bruklinu (kod bruklinskog mosta). Totalni underground :Hail:ps Kaze Blumberg da je u 2008. Njujork posetilo blizu 50 miliona turista :Hail: Od turizma grad prihodovao preko 30 milijardi dolara...

Edited by Luc

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NaughtyByNature

Je l' zna neko za neki posao ovde?

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