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noskich

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https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/mar/15/australia-records-strongest-annual-growth-in-home-prices

 

It comes just weeks after a report from the National Housing Finance and Investment Corp revealed the average first homebuyer is locked out of 70% of the housing market.

 

First homebuyers now need nine years to save a deposit compared to four years in the 1990s, the report found.

 

 

The price growth is creating a housing crisis with many Australians locked out of the property market and others staring down a multimillion loan that will last them their lifetimes.

 

Last year the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) assistant governor, Luci Ellis, admitted it was very difficult for people to enter the housing market if their parents didn’t already own a home.

“Some people will find it easier to buy a home than others based on the socioeconomic position they were born into,” she said.

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Nego drugarice i drugovi Viktorijanci, uzeste li 200 baka danas od Andrewsa? Ja bome tri od tri, uspelo mi je i za regionalni vaučer onomad i za melburnški posle njega i ovaj danas "republički". Već su za slobodu kretanja i oporavak ekonomije pali Walhalla i hotelčić u St Kilda, trenutno na slatkim mukama odabira treće destinacije. Važno da se para vrti, mi gradimo plutokratiju, plutokratija gradi nas!

  • +1 1
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Ćuti, ima manje od 20 dana do dolaska F1 cirkusa, a brojevi rastu. Ako opet otkažemo oteće nam trku i kako onda da se plezimo Sidnisajderima :) 

Edited by peralozac
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Joj nemoj zoooom, zoooom, zoomzoom, zoooom molim te, ja bih ipak da melburnške babe na pitanje smeta li im buka odgovaraju ono standardno neeee, neeee, nene, neeeeeeee...

  • Haha 1
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Posted (edited)

Evo bio i ja malo na Manly beach da iskoristim Groupon vaucher za Ben and Jerry's sladoled.

Manly jedna od najpoznatijih plaza u Sidneju, posred koje dve dugacke cevi iz kojih se govna direktno izlivaju u plazu.

Nisu samo ove dve, na slici, imaju jos dve, nego su udaljene pa ne moze da stane lepo na jednoj slici:

 

IMG-20220320-143234.jpg

 

https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-north/manly/beach-lifestyle

 

Manly is where the world's first surfing contest was held in 1964, making it one of Australia's most famous beaches. The iconic beach curves from South Steyne to North Steyne and Queenscliff, where a submerged reef, or bombora, creates the waves that inspire the world's best surfers to travel to our shores.

 

Ovi su cak uspeli obe cevi sa govnima da uhvate u jednoj slici, to jest sve 4:

174464.webp?itok=nh5Sh6VY

Edited by noskich
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4 hours ago, noskich said:

Manly jedna od najpoznatijih plaza u Sidneju, posred koje dve dugacke cevi iz kojih se govna direktno izlivaju u plazu.

 

Šta radoznala deca znaju o Aussie zavičaju, epizoda "Šta se dešava sa mojom piškom i kakom kada pustim vodu":

 

Spoiler

When you press the flush button, your wee, poo, toilet paper and water go down a pipe called a sewer. The toilet flushes the wastes down the sewer pipe. The sewer pipe from your house also collects and removes other wastes. This might be soapy water from baths and showers, or water left over from washing dishes and clothes. Together, all of these wastes are called "sewage". The pipes they travel through are called "sewerage pipes". People sometimes get "sewage" and "sewerage" mixed up.

 

The wastes from your house flow downhill. They join those from other homes and flow into bigger sewer pipes. Some of these pipes are bigger than a bus! If you live in a big city the wastes from thousands of people looks like a river of sewage.

 

The big sewer pipes take all the sewage to a place where it is treated. This place is called a sewage treatment plant. All towns and cities have these. They are like a big factory where any harmful materials are removed. This is a very important part of our city life.

 

Sewage contains lots of germs and if people come into contact with it, it can make them very sick. The treatment also removes things that people have flushed down the toilet. This includes things like toys, jewellery or even money. There are some things you should never flush down the toilet, like baby wipes – even if it says "flushable" on the packet – because they clump up and cause big problems for the sewerage system.

The sewage is cleaned in the treatment plant. This can take many days. It makes sure that harmful parts of the sewage are removed. Chemicals are added to kill as many germs as possible. Then the treated water is released into a local river or even the ocean. If you live near the coast your treated sewage probably goes into the ocean.

 

The treated sewage is cleaned to make sure that it does not cause environmental problems. This means that it should not harm the plants and fish that live in the river or ocean where it is released. If the sewage is not fully treated it can cause water pollution. It also should not make people sick if they swim in the river or ocean. Scientists test the water and the sewage wastes to make sure that it is OK.

 

Some treated sewage can be used to make energy or recycled to make water that can be used in factories or farms. Some countries, including parts of Australia, can even make water from treated sewage that is safe enough to drink. Singapore makes "recycled" drinking water out of treated sewage that is even purer than the level that the World Health Organisation (which is a group that makes a lot of suggestions about what's healthy and what's not) says is safe to drink.

 

Šta radoznali odrasli ljudi znaju o Aussie zavičaju, epizoda "Šta se dešava sa mojom piškom i kakom kada pustim vodu":

 

Spoiler

Wastewater doesn't have to go to waste

 

The 28 wastewater treatment plants (known as water resource recovery facilities) that we own and operate make sure that more than 1.3 billion litres of wastewater produced every day by over 1.8 million homes and businesses in Sydney, the Illawarra and the Blue Mountains doesn't create a hazard for Greater Sydney. We treat it and, where possible, recycle and reuse it.

 

What do our treatment plants do?

 

Our wastewater treatment plants treat the wastewater before it's reused or discharged to rivers or oceans. They follow strict licence conditions issued by the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA), which monitors the effect of discharges on water quality and aquatic life. They also produce biosolids – the nutrient-rich material created from treating wastewater solids. Biosolids are a rich source of phosphorus and nitrogen, which can be used in agriculture, composting and land rehabilitation. 


What are wastewater treatment levels?

 

Treating wastewater is about removing or breaking down what people have added to the water that leaves their home or business. We use different processes to remove impurities from wastewater at our treatment plants. The type of treatment needed depends on:

the location of the plant
where the treated water will be discharged or reused
the nature of the plant's catchment area, including wastewater quality.
There are 3 treatment levels: primary, secondary and tertiary.

 

Primary treatment

 

Our primary treatment includes screens, sedimentation and grit removal. Primary treatment methods include:

filtering wastewater through fine screens to remove items such as paper, cotton tips and plastic
removing sand and grit that has fallen to the bottom of aerated grit tanks
removing solids that have settled to the bottom of sedimentation tanks
removing oil and grease that floats to the top of tanks using scrapers.

 

Secondary treatment

 

Our secondary treatment process removes carbonaceous organic matter and nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from wastewater. This involves converting soluble decomposable organic matter into biomass. After this, the clarification process separates the biomass and any other suspended material from the liquid stream.
We design our treatment process on the characteristics of the sewage and the nutrients we need to remove. We create the conditions so selective organisms grow (mainly bacteria) to help with the treatment process. Our treatment process can even reduce pathogens and heavy metals in some cases.

 

Tertiary treatment

 

Our tertiary treatment includes filtering, disinfecting and preparing wastewater for recycling.

 

Filtering and disinfecting

 

Treated wastewater from a biological reactor and an intermittently decanted aerated lagoon (IDAL) are combined.

We add alum to help remove additional phosphorus particles and group remaining solids together for easy removal in the filters.

The treated wastewater then flows to sand filters. The wastewater sinks down through these filters where the sand traps particles.

Filtered water then flows to a chlorine contact tank for disinfection. After the water is disinfected, we remove any remaining chlorine before discharging the treated wastewater. Alternatively, we may use ultraviolet lamps for disinfection.

 

Preparing wastewater for recycling

 

Treated wastewater from biological reactors can be passed through deep sand filters where the sand traps any remaining particles. Then clear wastewater goes to a water recycling water plant where it is filtered through fine membranes to remove very small particles.

The water is pumped at high pressure through reverse osmosis membranes. This is the finest level of filtration – it removes molecules including bacteria, viruses and parasites.

The recycled water may also be treated with chlorine before it enters the recycled water distribution pipes. 

 

Less than 1% of Sydney's wastewater is discharged untreated to the ocean at Vaucluse, Diamond Bay and Diamond Bay South. The Refresh Vaucluse Diamond Bay project will ensure that all wastewater is treated at Bondi's Wastewater Treatment Plant in the future.

 

Neka me Sidnisajderi isprave ako grešim, postrojenje najbliže Manly plaži je North Head. Kako ovde piše, oni prerađene otpadne vode izbacuju duboko u okean, skoro 4km od obale.

 

Tako da ne znam kakve su to cevke što si slikao, ali sam prilično uveren da iz njih ne izlazi ljudska piška i kaka. Možda su u pitanju cevi za kišne vode (stormwater) što je potpuno druga priča. Radoznala Aussie deca i odrasli ljudi znaju da se posle jače kiše prljavština sa ulica slije u okean i da treba sačekati dan dva pre kupanja na gradskim plažama. Kod naske u Melburnu ima Beach Report sajt gde se tokom letnje sezone svakodnevno meri kvalitet vode na različitim lokacijama u zalivu, pretpostavljam da nešto slično postoji i za Sidnej.

  • +1 1
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Kako to da je kanalizacija u zemlji sa gustinom naseljenosti osmom najnižom na planeti pretvorena ovde u neku dramu... Ah, da... koji je to auto bolji od noskiča.

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56 minutes ago, Indy said:

Kako to da je kanalizacija u zemlji sa gustinom naseljenosti osmom najnižom na planeti pretvorena ovde u neku dramu... Ah, da... koji je to auto bolji od noskiča.

 

U Srbiji se direktno izliva, možda je pomislio da je svuda tako :tongue:

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Indy said:

Kako to da je kanalizacija u zemlji sa gustinom naseljenosti osmom najnižom na planeti pretvorena ovde u neku dramu... Ah, da... koji je to auto bolji od noskiča.

2% australijske populacije živi na teritoriji obojenoj žutom bojom. Mapa

Toliko o gustini naseljenosti.

Samo u Sidneju i Melburnu živi skoro pola stanovništva. Ako se uzmu najvećih 5 gradova to je već cela zemlja.

 

 

Edited by noskich
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4 hours ago, peralozac said:

 

Šta radoznala deca znaju o Aussie zavičaju, epizoda "Šta se dešava sa mojom piškom i kakom kada pustim vodu":

 

  Reveal hidden contents

When you press the flush button, your wee, poo, toilet paper and water go down a pipe called a sewer. The toilet flushes the wastes down the sewer pipe. The sewer pipe from your house also collects and removes other wastes. This might be soapy water from baths and showers, or water left over from washing dishes and clothes. Together, all of these wastes are called "sewage". The pipes they travel through are called "sewerage pipes". People sometimes get "sewage" and "sewerage" mixed up.

 

The wastes from your house flow downhill. They join those from other homes and flow into bigger sewer pipes. Some of these pipes are bigger than a bus! If you live in a big city the wastes from thousands of people looks like a river of sewage.

 

The big sewer pipes take all the sewage to a place where it is treated. This place is called a sewage treatment plant. All towns and cities have these. They are like a big factory where any harmful materials are removed. This is a very important part of our city life.

 

Sewage contains lots of germs and if people come into contact with it, it can make them very sick. The treatment also removes things that people have flushed down the toilet. This includes things like toys, jewellery or even money. There are some things you should never flush down the toilet, like baby wipes – even if it says "flushable" on the packet – because they clump up and cause big problems for the sewerage system.

The sewage is cleaned in the treatment plant. This can take many days. It makes sure that harmful parts of the sewage are removed. Chemicals are added to kill as many germs as possible. Then the treated water is released into a local river or even the ocean. If you live near the coast your treated sewage probably goes into the ocean.

 

The treated sewage is cleaned to make sure that it does not cause environmental problems. This means that it should not harm the plants and fish that live in the river or ocean where it is released. If the sewage is not fully treated it can cause water pollution. It also should not make people sick if they swim in the river or ocean. Scientists test the water and the sewage wastes to make sure that it is OK.

 

Some treated sewage can be used to make energy or recycled to make water that can be used in factories or farms. Some countries, including parts of Australia, can even make water from treated sewage that is safe enough to drink. Singapore makes "recycled" drinking water out of treated sewage that is even purer than the level that the World Health Organisation (which is a group that makes a lot of suggestions about what's healthy and what's not) says is safe to drink.

 

Šta radoznali odrasli ljudi znaju o Aussie zavičaju, epizoda "Šta se dešava sa mojom piškom i kakom kada pustim vodu":

 

  Reveal hidden contents

Wastewater doesn't have to go to waste

 

The 28 wastewater treatment plants (known as water resource recovery facilities) that we own and operate make sure that more than 1.3 billion litres of wastewater produced every day by over 1.8 million homes and businesses in Sydney, the Illawarra and the Blue Mountains doesn't create a hazard for Greater Sydney. We treat it and, where possible, recycle and reuse it.

 

What do our treatment plants do?

 

Our wastewater treatment plants treat the wastewater before it's reused or discharged to rivers or oceans. They follow strict licence conditions issued by the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA), which monitors the effect of discharges on water quality and aquatic life. They also produce biosolids – the nutrient-rich material created from treating wastewater solids. Biosolids are a rich source of phosphorus and nitrogen, which can be used in agriculture, composting and land rehabilitation. 


What are wastewater treatment levels?

 

Treating wastewater is about removing or breaking down what people have added to the water that leaves their home or business. We use different processes to remove impurities from wastewater at our treatment plants. The type of treatment needed depends on:

the location of the plant
where the treated water will be discharged or reused
the nature of the plant's catchment area, including wastewater quality.
There are 3 treatment levels: primary, secondary and tertiary.

 

Primary treatment

 

Our primary treatment includes screens, sedimentation and grit removal. Primary treatment methods include:

filtering wastewater through fine screens to remove items such as paper, cotton tips and plastic
removing sand and grit that has fallen to the bottom of aerated grit tanks
removing solids that have settled to the bottom of sedimentation tanks
removing oil and grease that floats to the top of tanks using scrapers.

 

Secondary treatment

 

Our secondary treatment process removes carbonaceous organic matter and nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from wastewater. This involves converting soluble decomposable organic matter into biomass. After this, the clarification process separates the biomass and any other suspended material from the liquid stream.
We design our treatment process on the characteristics of the sewage and the nutrients we need to remove. We create the conditions so selective organisms grow (mainly bacteria) to help with the treatment process. Our treatment process can even reduce pathogens and heavy metals in some cases.

 

Tertiary treatment

 

Our tertiary treatment includes filtering, disinfecting and preparing wastewater for recycling.

 

Filtering and disinfecting

 

Treated wastewater from a biological reactor and an intermittently decanted aerated lagoon (IDAL) are combined.

We add alum to help remove additional phosphorus particles and group remaining solids together for easy removal in the filters.

The treated wastewater then flows to sand filters. The wastewater sinks down through these filters where the sand traps particles.

Filtered water then flows to a chlorine contact tank for disinfection. After the water is disinfected, we remove any remaining chlorine before discharging the treated wastewater. Alternatively, we may use ultraviolet lamps for disinfection.

 

Preparing wastewater for recycling

 

Treated wastewater from biological reactors can be passed through deep sand filters where the sand traps any remaining particles. Then clear wastewater goes to a water recycling water plant where it is filtered through fine membranes to remove very small particles.

The water is pumped at high pressure through reverse osmosis membranes. This is the finest level of filtration – it removes molecules including bacteria, viruses and parasites.

The recycled water may also be treated with chlorine before it enters the recycled water distribution pipes. 

 

Less than 1% of Sydney's wastewater is discharged untreated to the ocean at Vaucluse, Diamond Bay and Diamond Bay South. The Refresh Vaucluse Diamond Bay project will ensure that all wastewater is treated at Bondi's Wastewater Treatment Plant in the future.

 

Neka me Sidnisajderi isprave ako grešim, postrojenje najbliže Manly plaži je North Head. Kako ovde piše, oni prerađene otpadne vode izbacuju duboko u okean, skoro 4km od obale.

 

Tako da ne znam kakve su to cevke što si slikao, ali sam prilično uveren da iz njih ne izlazi ljudska piška i kaka. Možda su u pitanju cevi za kišne vode (stormwater) što je potpuno druga priča. Radoznala Aussie deca i odrasli ljudi znaju da se posle jače kiše prljavština sa ulica slije u okean i da treba sačekati dan dva pre kupanja na gradskim plažama. Kod naske u Melburnu ima Beach Report sajt gde se tokom letnje sezone svakodnevno meri kvalitet vode na različitim lokacijama u zalivu, pretpostavljam da nešto slično postoji i za Sidnej.

Možda ti je uteha što je reč o govnima plutokrata, njihova mirišu za razliku od govana raje:

https://theconversation.com/australias-pristine-beaches-have-a-poo-problem-116175

At present, places where sewage impacts are generating community concern include Merimbula, Warrnambool and, perhaps most bizarrely, Vaucluse and Diamond Bay in Sydney’s affluent eastern suburbs.

It’s hard to believe this location has raw and untreated sewage from 3,500 people discharged directly into the Tasman Sea. Sydney Water pledged in 2018 to fix this unsightly pollution by transferring the flow to the nearby Bondi sewage treatment plant.

 

Tu gde su kuće plus minus 100 miliona dolara govna plivaju na vodi.

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1 hour ago, Time Crisis said:

 

U Srbiji se direktno izliva, možda je pomislio da je svuda tako :tongue:

Potpuno isto kao u Australiji.

I opet, NEMA razlike u odjevanju!

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